Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Python - First Step Towards Programming

Let's start with an example program to find Fibonacci series

>>> # Fibonacci series:
... # the sum of two elements defines the next
... a, b = 0, 1
>>> while b < 10:
...     print(b) 
...     a, b = b, a+b 
...     
1




8


This example introduces several new features.

  • The first line contains a multiple assignment: the variables a and b simultaneously get the new values 0 and 1. On the last line this is used again, demonstrating that the expressions on the right-hand side are all evaluated first before any of the assignments take place. The right-hand side expressions are evaluated from the left to the right.

  • The while loop executes as long as the condition (here: b < 10) remains true. In Python, like in C, any non-zero integer value is true; zero is false. The condition may also be a string or list value, in fact any sequence; anything with a non-zero length is true, empty sequences are false. The test used in the example is a simple comparison. The standard comparison operators are written the same as in C: < (less than), > (greater than), == (equal to), <= (less than or equal to), >= (greater than or equal to) and != (not equal to).

  • The body of the loop is indented: indentation is Python’s way of grouping statements. Python does not (yet!) provide an intelligent input line editing facility, so you have to type a tab or space(s) for each indented line. In practice you will prepare more complicated input for Python with a text editor; most text editors have an auto-indent facility. When a compound statement is entered interactively, it must be followed by a blank line to indicate completion (since the parser cannot guess when you have typed the last line). Note that each line within a basic block must be indented by the same amount.

  • The print() function writes the value of the expression(s) it is given. It differs from just writing the expression you want to write (as we did earlier in the calculator examples) in the way it handles multiple expressions, floating point quantities, and strings. Strings are printed without quotes, and a space is inserted between items, so you can format things nicely, like this:


  • >>> i = 256*256
    >>> print('The value of i is', i)
    The value of i is 65536

    The keyword end can be used to avoid the newline after the output, or end the output with a different string:

    >>> a, b = 0, 1
    >>> while b < 1000: 
    ...      print(b, end=',') 
    ...      a, b = b, a+b 
    ... 
    1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,34,55,89,144,233,377,610,987,

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